FRENCH COFFEE CAKE

My experience of these type of coffee cakes is that they don’t last long.  Firstly, they taste good and get eaten quickly and secondly they dry out and can’t be kept more than a day or so.  Not sure if there’s anything French about them, but I do know it’s the topping that makes them so good.

This recipe comes from the back of a 1970s White Wings Plain Flour packet so you need to do some metric conversions.  1oz = 30ml, 2oz = 60ml and the pan size converts to a 15cm tin.  Enjoy!!

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RIPPLED CHOC-SPICE CAKE

When my children were little I used to make a Chocolate Ripple Cake as the base for their birthday cakes.  The recipe I made was the same as this one, but without the spice.  The cake always taste good, although when I look back at the photos I can see that my decoration, while enthusiastic, could hardly be described as a work of art……

TOPSY-TURVY APRICOT PUDDING

When I first read this recipe I thought it was going to be a fairly standard apricot pudding, then I came to the addition of the cocoa and realized it was actually a Chocolate Upside Down Pudding.  I then read on to ‘serve warm with custard or cream’ and decided I could eat a piece there and then – yummy.

ECCLES CAKES

All I’ve ever known about Eccles cakes is that they are English.  So when I found this recipe I thought I’d better find out a bit more about them.  Good old Wikipedia tells me that ‘Eccles cakes are named after the English town of Eccles. It is not known who invented the recipe, but James Birch is credited with being the first person to sell Eccles cakes commercially, from his shop in the town centre in 1793″.  Any fans of the 1950s Goon Show will also know that Eccles was a character played by Spike Milligan – an amiable, well-meaning man with no wits or understanding, in other words a bit of an idiot.  So the humble Eccles Cake has quite a history.